WHO WE ARE


PUSKAPA stands for "Pusat Kajian dan Advokasi Perlindungan dan Kualitas Hidup Anak." It translates to "Center of Knowledge and Advocacy for Children's Protection and Wellbeing", although we'd rather go by "Center on Child Protection and Wellbeing.

In PUSKAPA, "knowledge" goes hand-in-hand with "advocacy". It is never just research for the sake of doing research, and we never do an advocacy without evidence.


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OUR PRINCIPLES

OUR PRINCIPLES

PUSKAPA's work are governed by 6 key principles, which are:

1. Putting children and people with special needs at the center of the work

2. Our approach is ethical, respectful, and based on the ‘Do No Harm’ principle

3. We value partnerships and engage our partners actively and openly in all activities

4. We are committed to supporting and developing national and subnational capacities

5. We are committed to the widespread dissemination of our research findings and field experiences

6. We seek to work within the framework of Child Rights, and to have open and transparent relationships with national and local authorities in the environments where we carry out activities

“PUSKAPA has shown that there is no gap between science and reality. Knowledge produced should not be contained in academic space, but should be further applied in practice through mediums such as training and programmatic recommendations to improve the wellbeing of children in Indonesia. PUSKAPA’s holistic approach to problem-solving and its strength in interdisciplinary network and partners at national, regional, and global level has made PUSKAPA one of the most prolific and unique research centers in the field of child protection in Indonesia. Onwards, PUSKAPA!”

Dr. Arie S. Soesilo, M.Sc - the Dean of FISIP Universitas Indonesia

WHAT WE DO


WHAT WE DO

PUSKAPA is an interdisciplinary team of researchers, policy thinkers, and program implementers.
We work with scientists, practitioners, and civil society actors to help the government improve children's access to health, education, justice, and social care.

HOW WE DO IT


1
RESEARCH
To generate the scientific evidence behind the solutions
2
POLICY ADVOCACY
To promote the solutions through public dialogue, technical assistance, program design, management, and evaluation.
3
CAPACITY BUILDING
To train, mentor, and provide field experiences for the next generation of researchers and practitioners.

HOW WE DO IT


1
RESEARCH
To generate the scientific evidence behind the solutions
2
POLICY ADVOCACY
To promote the solutions through public dialogue, technical assistance, program design, management, and evaluation.
3
CAPACITY BUILDING
To train, mentor, and provide field experiences for the next generation of researchers and practitioners.

WHY INVEST IN CHILDREN



WHY INVEST IN CHILDREN

Indonesia has institutionalized stronger governments and survived frequent large-scale natural disasters as well as a number of economic crises in recent years. We have achieved lower-middle income status and managed to maintain a steady economic growth rate. Despite the sturdy economy, poverty and access to quality basic services remain the country’s biggest problems.

More than 96 million individuals, almost 25 million of whom are children, are still living in the poorest households. 37% of under-five year-olds are stunted. With close to 113 million people under the age of 25, youth unemployment in Indonesia is one of the highest in the Asia-Pacific region, reaching 18% as of May 2013. Moreover, 70% of the unemployed are between the ages of 15 and 29. Quality of human resources is still low, with 60% of the workforce only having graduated from elementary school, 16% having graduated from junior secondary school, and 19% from senior secondary school.

Indonesia’s PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) score is among the lowest in the world, indicating that the education system is going nowhere despite massive investment. Almost half of Indonesian children do not have a birth certificate, and the prevalence of child marriage is still high, at the rate of 25%. More than half of women who were married before they turned 18 live in poverty. It is estimated that every year two to three million women and children in Indonesia experience abuse and/or violence.


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CHILD PROTECTION GRADUATE PROGRAM



The Department of Criminology at the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Indonesia offers a Master’s of Criminology Specialization for Child Protection for those who seek careers and have the interests in contributing for to child protection policy. The Child Protection Specialization program aims to equip participants with the scientific and practical skills necessary to analyze social systems, and develop child protection research, programs and policy.

Discussion-topics covered include child protection systems and a protective environment protection, social research methods that are relevant and sensitive to the protection of children, as well as knowledge and skills on policies and the implementation of programs. This specialization is intended to prepare future generations who will dedicate themselves to the welfare of children in Indonesia, as well as internationally.


Rahmadi Usman

“The opportunity to continue studying at the graduate level with a specialization in child protection is a great opportunity, and an honor for me. This program would be relevant for anyone concerned with children's issues, anyone wanting to learn, explore and apply knowledge about children's issues to improve the future of Indonesia’s children.”

Rima Ameilia

“The graduate program with a specialization in child protection presents the opportunity for me to follow my passion in children’s issues and to broaden my perspective on the protection of children. Based on my experience, children’s issues, and their relationship with drug abuse, are not often discussed in Indonesian society, which makes me especially excited to start the child protection graduate education. Let’s fight for child protection in Indonesia!”


Rahmadi Usman

“The opportunity to continue studying at the graduate level with a specialization in child protection is a great opportunity, and an honor for me. This program would be relevant for anyone concerned with children's issues, anyone wanting to learn, explore and apply knowledge about children's issues to improve the future of Indonesia’s children.”

Rima Ameilia

“The graduate program with a specialization in child protection presents the opportunity for me to follow my passion in children’s issues and to broaden my perspective on the protection of children. Based on my experience, children’s issues, and their relationship with drug abuse, are not often discussed in Indonesian society, which makes me especially excited to start the child protection graduate education. Let’s fight for child protection in Indonesia!”

STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS


For PUSKAPA, to be able to grow as a healthy institution is as important as being able to contribute to meaningful and excellent work. PUSKAPA aims to stay relevant by linking our research and advocacy to policy and program developments, and to continue building those research and advocacy infrastructures within Universitas Indonesia, a prestigious national university in the country.

For an organization like PUSKAPA, sustainability means turning available resources into long-term investment of institution, knowledge, and human capital building. We cannot do it alone. It can only be achieved when partners understand and are willing to make that kind of investment in PUSKAPA, beyond short-term or one-off procurement of service. We call this a strategic partnership.

Through strategic partnerships, PUSKAPA and its partners collaborate to achieve goals that are set together through research, evidence-informed programmatic decisions, monitoring and measured course-adaptation, and continuous promotion of durable solutions, as well as consultations with individuals and communities we seek to assist. Strategic partnerships also ensure that the resources from multiple partners are utilized to the highest efficacy and accountability.





MEET THE TEAM


SANTI KUSUMANINGRUM


Director

IRWANTO


Chair of PUSKAPA's Board of Advisor

NI MADE MARTINI


Head of Operations

CYRIL BENNOUNA


Senior Advisor for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation

CLARA SIAGIAN


Senior Researcher

DALIMAYA


Finance Manager

ERIANDO RIZKY


Research & Advocacy Assistant

FERI SAHPUTRA


Research & Advocacy Associate

CENDY ADAM


Research & Advocacy Assistant

HARRIZ JATI


Knowledge Manager

MARSHA HABIB


Program & Communication Officer

NI LUH PUTU MAITRA AGASTYA


Technical Lead for Social Protection

PETTY HANDANI


Logistic & Procurement Officer

MEUTIA AULIA RAHMI


Research and Advocacy Assistant

PUTRI KUSUMA AMANDA


Program Manager & Technical Lead for Access to Justice

BONDAN MAHARDHIKA UTOMO


Finance Assistant

RAHMADI USMAN


Research & Advocacy Associate

RAMA ADI PUTRA


Research & Advocacy Associate

SANDRA DEWI ARIFIANI


Research & Advocacy Associate

SHAILA TIEKEN


Research & Advocacy Assistant

WIDI LARAS SARI


Associate for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation

TRINIA PRABAWANI


Finance Assistant

WENNY WANDASARI


Research & Advocacy Associate

WINDY LIEM


Research & Advocacy Associate

YANTI NURHAYATI


Secretary

YULIANTI


Administrative Assistant



CONTACT US


Gedung FISIP UI Nusantara II Lantai 1,
Jl. Margonda Raya, Depok, Jawa Barat
(021) 78849181
puskapa@puskapa.org

2017. PUSKAPA INDONESIA. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.